Fourth Generation Eagle Scout

Scouting – A Family Affair, Local Scout Becomes 4th Generation Eagle Scout

3 generations of valentine family

On February 12th, 2014, Brent Valentine received a prestigious title that he had been coveting ever since he was a little boy. It isn’t simply a title that he can ask his parents for or bestow upon himself; no, it is a title that has to be earned with preparation, determination and hard work. On that Wednesday, Brent, a Scout from Troop 90 in Newport Beach, earned his Eagle Scout Rank, a cause for celebration that dates back to four generations in the Valentine family.

Brent is the 158th Eagle Scout from Troop 90, which was founded just over 25 years ago.  Nationally, approximately only 2% of all Scouts obtain the rank of Eagle. Troop 90’s percentage of Eagle Scouts earning their Rank is between 15 and 17%.

Brent’s Great-Grandfather, George Josten, received his Eagle Badge from Scouting’s founder Lord Baden-Powell himself at a ceremony held in Madison Square Garden on May 17, 1919.  George was a member of Troop 9 in New Brunswick, New Jersey. Brent’s Grandfather, Don Valentine, received his Eagle Badge on October 10, 1949 as a member of Troop 9 in Pasadena. Don has been a member of the San Gabriel Valley Council, Boy Scouts of America for 76 years, making him its longest tenured member. Brent’s father, Bill Valentine, was a member of Troop 377 in Pasadena and was presented his Eagle Badge on June 13, 1980. It’s evident that Scouting is a celebrated and cherished tradition in the Valentine family.
4 generations_valentine men
When asked what it meant to become a fourth generation Eagle Scout, Brent stated, “Being an Eagle Scout is great by itself and adding the history makes it even better. It’s also fun! There was little expectation for me to become an Eagle Scout. I wanted it and wanted to do it for my grandfather. I was asking my dad to do Cub Scouts ever since I was little.”

Brent’s father, Bill, stated that Brent was the driving force in his quest for Eagle Scout Rank.  At eleven years old, Brent was given a Scouting handbook from his father, after Brent’s repeated pleas to join the Scouts, and by his first troop meeting, he had everything memorized. “I didn’t get signed off, but I even did all the work for my first merit badge before that first troop meeting,” Brent eagerly recalls.

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Aside from the family bonding, Brent has developed and cultivated new passions. He completed his fishing merit badge at the Newport Sea Base and had a great experience. “I heard stories from my dad and grandfather about fishing and it’s something I always wanted to try,” Brent said. Now it’s become one of his biggest hobbies and Brent finds himself on the water fishing at least two times a week.

“One of the biggest things to look at is how merit badges are designed to let you discover the world,” Bill stated. Brent did a couple merit badges that helped him discover what he wouldn’t want to do as either a career or hobby. The merit badges provide the opportunities to find your career path and later on if you’re in a social setting, you have some background information on a multitude of subjects and can have a discussion with anybody.

Brent Valentine with Assistant Scoutmaster Adam Wright - lef

When asked what element of Scouting had the biggest impact on Brent’s life, he said “I was the Senior Patrol Leader of one of the county’s largest troops and I was 13 at the time. To run a troop and actually have people listen, I look back now and I’m amazed. I was able to lead in a way where the boys respected me and liked me. I tried to make it fun because that’s what Scouting should be.

OC Scouts Honor Fallen Soldiers on Memorial Day

MEDIA ADVISORY

Orange County Scouts will honor fallen soldiers and veterans at Memorial Day celebrations

 Scouts from theOrange County Council, Boy Scouts of America (OCBSA), will attend and serve in Memorial Day remembrance celebrations throughout Orange County this coming Friday, Saturday and Monday.

OCBSA Scouts will do their good turn through several acts of service which include: placing flags and crosses on veterans’ gravesites; celebrating with Venture Scouts, Girl Scouts, veterans, family, friends and many other volunteers aiding in honoring our country’s heroes; and escorting widows of fallen sailors at a memorial service.

For more information about the numerous Memorial Day celebrations and acts of service, contact Kaleigh Teskey, OCBSA marketing and PR specialist. Scouting volunteers and leaders and Scouts of all ages will be available for pictures and comments at each event listed below.

Where,  When & Who:    

Friday, May 23, 2014:

 –       El Toro Memorial Park (25751 Trabuco Rd., Lake Forest, CA 92630)

5:00 p.m.

Troop 772, of Laguna Niguel, and Troop 727, of Rancho Santa Margarita, along with other Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts, Venturers, Girl Scouts and veterans, will place flags and crosses on gravesites.

–       Mission Cemetery in San Juan Capistrano (near Ortega Hwy and 5 freeway)

6:00 p.m.

Troop 724, of San Juan Capistrano, will place flags on gravesites.

Saturday, May 24, 2014:

–       Fairhaven Memorial Park (1702 Fairhaven Ave., Santa Ana, CA 92705)

8:00 a.m. -12:00 p.m.

Troop 28, of Santa Ana. Pack 563, of Fountain Valley, will begin placing flags at 7:30 a.m.

–       Memory Garden Memorial Park (455 W Central Ave, Brea, CA 92821)

7:00- 9:00 a.m.

Order of the Arrow (OA), OCBSA’s honorary society, and Pack 820, of Brea, will lay crosses and flags on gravesites.

–       Loma Vista Memorial Park (701 E. Bastanchury Rd., Fullerton, CA 92835)

7:45 a.m.

Pack 811, of Brea, will lay flags and crosses on gravesites.

Monday, May 26, 2014

–       Fairhaven Memorial Park (1702 Fairhaven Ave., Santa Ana, CA 92705)

10:30 a.m.

Pack 563, of Fountain Valley, will participate in a community celebration honoring veterans.

–       Memory Garden Memorial Park (455 W Central Ave, Brea, CA 92821)

10:30 a.m.

Order of the Arrow (OA), OCBSA’s honorary society, and Pack 820, of Brea, will carry the flags of new vets buried in the cemetery and line them in the streets as a dedication.

–       Naval Weapons Station Seal Beach (800 Seal Beach Blvd, Seal Beach, CA 90740)

11:00 a.m.

OA Wiatava Lodge, OCBSA’s honorary society, will act as escorts to the widows of fallen sailors at a memorial service. Prior to this event, the OA members cleaned and prepped the memorial site.               

Contact     For media inquiries:

Kaleigh Teskey, OCBSA

(O) 714.546.8558 ext. 152

(C) 714.679.4366

Kteskey@ocsba.org

Popcorn Drive Remembers US Troops

Orange County Boy Scouts’ Popcorn Drive remembers U.S. troops here and overseas

SANTA ANA, Calif., (Oct. 18, 2013) – The Orange County Council, Boy Scouts of America (OCBSA) 20th Popcorn Drive is underway throughout Orange County, with a portion of sales being given to support U.S. troops locally and overseas. Featuring 17 flavors of popcorn, Boy Scouts are now taking orders for delivery in November, and selling popcorn door?to?door and at local retail stores

Purchasers of popcorn can personally enjoy the snack or support U.S. troops by designating a $35 or $55 donation. Trail’s End, the popcorn manufacturing company that sends popcorn to military bases nationally and globally, forwards the donated popcorn to U.S. troops. Seventy percent of any popcorn purchase goes to local Scouting in Orange County..

“The annual Popcorn Drive has become synonymous with Boy Scouts, relying upon a carefully planned campaign that is orchestrated by some of the best volunteers who give endlessly, working hand-in-hand with our staff and Trail’s End to remember our troops and add more valued programs to touch more Scouts,” said Jeff Herrmann, President and Scout Executive, Orange County Council, Boy Scouts of America.

The Popcorn Drive is the largest annual fundraising effort for the OCBSA, raising approximately $1.2 million in 2012 and enlisting more than 500 volunteers to coordinate the extensive county?wide effort.

Companies that want to purchase popcorn as gifts for employees and/or clients can choose from the Corporate Collection that features special combinations of flavored popcorn in gift boxes or gift tins. For more details on the purchase of popcorn, contact Rachel Cueva at 714.545.8558, x132or visit the website at www.ocbsa.org.

About the Orange County Council, Boy Scouts of America:

The Orange County Council is one of the largest youth-serving agencies in the county serving more than 30,000 youth with educational programs that instill values, develop social and leadership skills, and promotes physical fitness and environmental awareness. The mission of the Boy Scouts of America is to prepare young people to make ethical and moral choices over their lifetimes by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Scout Law.

ADVENTURE BEGINS JAMBOREE 2013

For Immediate Release

  

ADVENTURE BEGINS AT SUMMIT BECHTEL FAMILY NATIONAL SCOUT RESERVE WITH THE 2013 NATIONAL SCOUT JAMBOREE

Boy Scouts of America Welcomes 40,000 People to West Virginia to Celebrate Scouting 

MOUNT HOPE, West Virginia (July 15, 2013)—Today, more than 700 buses are transporting approximately 30,000 Scouts, Venturers, and leaders from across the nation to the expansive new Summit Bechtel Family National Scout Reserve in West Virginia for the 2013 National Scout Jamboree. The Summit is now the permanent home for the Boy Scouts of America’s national jamboree, a celebration of Scouting held every four years. Located on a sprawling 10,600 acres in West Virginia’s world-renowned adventure sports region known as the New River Gorge, the jamboree takes place July 15–24 and embodies the theme “Go Big. Get Wild.”

The jamboree officially begins Tuesday morning, with a commencement show that features an inspirational flag ceremony, an introduction to the high-adventure activities available to participants, and recognition of the generous donors and philanthropists who made the Summit a reality.  The opening show will be streamed live at www.Jambolive.org (link becomes active Tuesday morning).  Throughout the day, participants can view the unveiling of the Walter Scott, Stephen Bechtel, and Jim Justice bronze statues on site, add in their own piece of history at the Scott Visitor Center time capsule ceremony, and join in on high-adventure activities.

“It is my honor to welcome our Scouting family and the community to this historic day for the Boy Scouts of America as we unveil our newest Scouting venue,” said Wayne Perry, president of the BSA. “It took a great deal of hard work, but through the dedication of the more than 1,000 West Virginians who helped with construction effortsas well as the generous gifts of our donors and the entire Scouting communitywe have opened a remarkable site for what will be a truly once-in-a-lifetime experience for all who attend.”

During the 10-day jamboree, Scouts participate in adventures unlike anywhere else, including more than five miles of zip line challenge courses, 36 miles of mountain bike trails, and 13 acres of shooting sports, as well as kayaking, rock climbing, bouldering, skateboarding, BMX, and various other activities. The excitement of the jamboree isn’t limited to Scoutsthe Boy Scouts of America is also inviting the community to check out the Summit’s 100-acre visitor area, where day-users can sample some of the high-adventure activities. The visitor experience will be available to the general public beginning on Wednesday, July 17.

“The nation and even the world will soon see what the Boy Scouts of America has been so excited about here at the Summit,” said Wayne Brock, Chief Scout Executive of the BSA. “This magnificent site has been years in the making, and there is no better way to celebrate Scouting than to host the 2013 National Scout Jamboree at the Summit, where the future of adventure and leadership begins for the youth that we serve.”

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OFFICIALLY OPENING 2013 NATIONAL SCOUT JAMBOREE—2

While the jamboree is under way, the Summit is the third-largest city in West Virginia. With a massive undertaking like that, the BSA called on many partners to complete the site in time for the 2013 National

Scout Jamboree and to do so in a sustainable manner. Partners include the state of West Virginia, the city of Mount Hope, Fayette County, New River Gorge Economic Development Authority, the National Park Service, West Virginia National Guard, Fayette County Commission, and many others who have played an instrumental role in the Summit’s development.

Community service projects during the jamboree are going to have a strong impact on West Virginia, helping to beautify the state in coordination with its 150th birthday. Over the course of five days, approximately 30,000 youth will complete more than 300,000 hours of community service at 350 projects at sites in McDowell, Mercer, Monroe, Raleigh, Greenbrier, Summers, Nicholas, Wyoming, and Fayette counties. Through activities such as clearing brush, performing repairs, cleaning litter, painting, planting, constructing walkways and shelters, and pouring concrete, the total economic impact in the area will be in the millions.

Plans for the Summit began in 2007, when BSA leadership began looking for a new home for the national jamboree. After reviewing more than 80 sites in 28 states, the BSA chose the property in West Virginia in 2009. The Summit project was initiated through a generous donation of $50 million from the S. D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation and the Stephen Bechtel Fund. Large gifts from Jim Justice, the Hazel Ruby McQuain Charitable Trust, Ed and Jeanne Arnold, Terrence and Peggy Dunn, J. Brett Harvey, the Suzanne and Walter Scott Foundation, Mike and Gillian Goodrich, and Philip Condit helped build much of the reserve. Many other donations have been contributed as the project has progressed.

Participants have the opportunity to camp out with friends, meet new people, try high-adventure activities, learn new skills, enjoy the outdoors, and have fun in an atmosphere of Scouting fellowship. Beginning Wednesday, July 17, visitors may attend the Jamboree by purchasing one-day tickets at Jambo 2013 Visitor Passes.

Since the first jamboree in 1937, it has become known as the BSA’s most iconic event, providing an opportunity for Scouts to gather together and celebrate Scouting, allowing Scouts from all backgrounds, faiths, and cultures to have experiences and create memories to last throughout their lifetimes. To learn more about the Summit Bechtel Family National Scout Reserve and the 2013 National Scout Jamboree, please visit https://summit.scouting.org.

About the Boy Scouts of America

The Boy Scouts of America provides the nation’s foremost youth program of character development and values-based leadership training, which helps young people be “Prepared. For Life.®” The Scouting organization is composed of 2.6 million youth members between the ages of 7 and 21 and more than a million volunteers in local councils throughout the United States and its territories. For more information on the Boy Scouts of America, please visit www.scouting.org.

Editor’s Note: To access daily photos of the National Scout Jamboree, please visit the official Boy Scouts of America Flickr photostream found here – http://www.flickr.com/photos/boyscoutsofamerica/. Instructions are as follows. Visit the photostream, choose the photo you want and click on it. In the bottom right corner of the screen just beneath the photo, look for the three dots; click the dots and choose “View all sizes” from the menu that pops up; this enables you to choose the size you want to download. Photos should be credited as “Photo courtesy of Boy Scouts of America” or “Photo: Boy Scouts of America.”

Open letter to…

 

Open letter to Chartered Partners, Unit Leaders, and parents of Orange County Council, Boy Scouts of America from the Orange County Council Key 4

At the Boy Scouts of America’s National Annual Meeting on May 23, the voting members of the National Council approved a resolution to remove the restriction denying membership to youth on the basis of sexual orientation alone. The resolution passed with over 61% of the vote. A change to the current membership policy for adult leaders was not under consideration; thus, the policy for adults remains in place. The resolution also reinforces that Scouting is a youth program, and any sexual conduct, whether heterosexual or homosexual, by youth of Scouting age is contrary to the virtues of Scouting. Also, it states that no member may use Scouting to promote or advance any social or political position or agenda.

This policy change is effective on Jan. 1, 2014, allowing the BSA the transition time needed to communicate and implement this policy to its approximately 116,000 Scouting units nation-wide. The Orange County Council’s focus remains to deliver the nation’s foremost youth program of character development and values-based leadership training. For more than a century, the Boy Scouts of America have been giving young people the opportunity to develop the skills they need to take responsibility and make their own decisions about important issues.

The topic of sexual orientation has been a high profile issue in our country over the past several decades and the BSA has often been a focal point of this ongoing national discussion. As we have always stated, the BSA does not have an agenda on the matter and resolving this complex issue is not the role of the organization. Scouting represents more than 2.6 million youth and one million adult members, across the nation, all with diverse beliefs and no single national Scouting policy can accommodate everyone’s views or resolve this debate. The recent review of the organization’s long-standing membership policy created an outpouring of feedback from the Scouting family and the American public.

The information our Council provided on this issue helped provide perspective to the process, and we respect the integrity of the national decision-making process. As the Council Chairman, Council Commissioner, Executive Vice-Chair, and Scout Executive of Orange County Council, we believe this update to our policy will allow all kids who sincerely want to be a part of Scouting to experience this life-changing program while remaining true to the long-standing virtues of Scouting. We also want to express our personal thanks on behalf of the council to our National Representatives who worked tirelessly and with tremendous integrity during the listening phase of this effort and demonstrated the best of what Scouting in Orange County Council looks  like.

Some have taken this action to mean the BSA has made a fundamental shift in values. We understand the new policy has generated a great many questions requiring a response. The following is meant to clearly articulate the new policy and the anticipated impact it will have on local units and members.

The BSA’s Membership Standards Policy:

The adult membership standards policy was not under consideration and remains unchanged, as follows: “While the BSA does not proactively inquire about the sexual orientation of employees, volunteers, or members, we do not grant membership to individuals who are open or avowed homosexuals or who engage in behavior that would become a distraction to the mission of the BSA.” Effective Jan, 1, 2014, the youth membership policy will be: “Membership in any program of the Boy Scouts of America requires the youth member to (a) subscribe to and abide by the values expressed in the Scout Oath and Scout Law, (b) subscribe to and abide by the precepts of the Declaration of Religious Principle (duty to God), and (c) demonstrate behavior that exemplifies the highest level of good conduct and respect for others and is consistent at all times with the values expressed in the Scout Oath and Scout Law. No youth may be denied membership in the Boy Scouts of America on the basis of sexual orientation or preference alone.”

What is staying the same?

•             The mission of the Boy Scouts of America is to prepare young people to make ethical and moral choices over their lifetimes by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Law.

•             The Scout Oath begins with duty to God, and the Scout Law ends with a Scout’s obligation to be reverent, and that will always remain a core value of the Boy Scouts of America.

•             Any sexual conduct, whether homosexual or heterosexual, by youth of Scouting age is contrary to the virtues of Scouting.

•             The BSA handbook defines morally straight as, “Scouts should be clean in speech and actions and faithful in religious beliefs,” and a clean Scout as “someone who keeps his body and mind fit, chooses friends who also live by high standards, and helps keep his home and community clean.”

•             Members must demonstrate behavior that exemplifies the highest level of good conduct and respect for others and is consistent at all times with the values expressed in the Scout Oath and Scout Law. Scouting’s chartered organizations have the right to uphold their own moral standards within the units they sponsor.

•             The BSA does not have an agenda on the matter of sexual orientation, and resolving this complex issue is not the role of our organization, nor may any member use Scouting to promote or advance any social or political position or agenda.

•             The BSA has stringent polices that protect the safety and privacy of youth and adult members and has always worked to ensure that it is a supportive and safe environment for young people (www.bsayouthprotection.org).

•             The organization will maintain its current membership policy for all adult leaders and within the framework of this policy chartering organizations have the right and responsibility to choose their own unit leaders. The Boy Scouts of America fully supports our chartered organizations.

What is changing?

•             Youth are still developing, learning about themselves and who they are, developing their sense of right and wrong, and understanding their duty to God to live a moral life. Accordingly, a youth member simply stating he or she is attracted to the same sex, but not engaging in sexual activity, does not make them ineligible for membership.

Frequently Asked Questions:

Understandably, a change to this BSA policy raises many questions among our chartered partners, parents, and unit-serving volunteers. The following are frequently asked questions and answers.

1. Is the BSA endorsing homosexuality and forcing its chartered organizations to do the same?

No. That is not the role of the organization, and Scouting is not the place to resolve divergent viewpoints in society. By reinforcing that Scouting is a youth program, and any sexual conduct, whether heterosexual or homosexual, by youth of Scouting age is contrary to the virtues of Scouting, and that no member may use Scouting to promote or advance any social or political position or agenda, this policy rightly recognizes there is a difference between kids and adults while remaining true to the long-standing virtues of Scouting.

2. If a chartered organization does not agree with allowing gay members, can it deny them membership or defer them to another unit?

No. Effective Jan. 1, 2014, no youth may be denied membership in the Boy Scouts of America on the basis of sexual orientation or preference alone. However, any sexual conduct, whether homosexual or heterosexual, by youth of Scouting age is contrary to the virtues of Scouting. As they always have, chartered organizations can require members to demonstrate behavior that exemplifies the highest level of good conduct and respect for others and is consistent at all times with the values expressed in the Scout Oath and Scout Law.

3. How does the BSA define “morally straight”?

As it has, the BSA handbook still defines morally straight as, “Scouts should be clean in speech and actions and faithful in religious beliefs,” and a clean Scout as “someone who keeps his body and mind fit, chooses friends who also live by high standards, and helps keep his home and community clean.” Any sexual conduct, whether homosexual or heterosexual, by youth of Scouting age is contrary to the virtues of Scouting.

4. Why was the policy amended only to include youth and not adults?

The review confirmed that this remains among the most complex and challenging issues facing the BSA and society today. Even with the wide range of input, it was extremely difficult to accurately quantify the potential impact of maintaining or changing the current policy. So the BSA decided to reaffirm the current policy for adults. While perspectives and opinions vary significantly, parents, adults in the Scouting community, and teens alike tend to agree that youth should not be denied the benefits of Scouting.

5. What will you do when a youth member becomes an adult?

When a member is no longer a youth participant, he or she must meet the requirements of our adult standards.

6. What are the next steps?

The policy change will be effective on Jan. 1, 2014, allowing the Boy Scouts of America the transition time needed to communicate and implement this policy to its approximately 116,000 Scouting units nation-wide. As the National Executive Committee just completed a lengthy review process, there are no plans for further review on this matter.

Additional Resources

The BSA has been and remains committed to engaging in discussion with its members about this policy. To learn more about the policy, please visit www.bsamembershipstandards.org. Also, following are additional helpful resources.

•     The Baptist Standard: An Open Letter to Southern Baptists
•     The Washington Post: Catholic Church sees ‘hopeful future’ in the Boy Scouts, even if openly gay scouts allowed
•      The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Newsroom:  Church Responds to Boy Scouts Policy Vote
•      The Deseret News: What the Boy Scouts of America decision means for your son

We believe Scouting in Orange County is bigger than this single issue. We are finding that when people read the new policy, they see it reflects the beliefs of most of Scouting’s major religious chartered organizations. In Orange County Council, we take great pride in creating an environment where people and religious organizations, who may disagree on a variety of topics, still work together to achieve life-changing benefits to youth through its program. Scouting will continue to focus on reaching and serving youth in order to help them grow into good, strong citizens. By focusing on the goals that unite us, we are able to accomplish incredible things for young people in the communities we serve. While people have different opinions about this policy, we can all agree that kids are better off when they are in Scouting and we can  still work together to accomplish great things for youth. In the coming weeks and months we will be working with the National Council and our key council leaders to develop a smooth transition to the new policy.  Going forward, we will work to stay focused on that which unites us, namely, delivering the finest youth program available to the greatest number of kids.

Thank you for all you do for Scouting and for the youth in your community. Together, we can accomplish great things. Orange County professional staff and volunteers are available to review this policy and answer any questions you may have. Please feel free to contact us at (714) 546-4990 or comments@ocbsa.org

Rob Neal, Chairman of the Board

John Hovanesian, Council Commissioner

Bob Theirgartner, Executive Vice Chair of the Board

Jeff Herrmann, President/Scout Executive

ORANGE COUNTY COUNCIL, BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA HONORS JAMES “WATTY” WATSON AT 9TH INVESTMENT REAL ESTATE LUNCHEON

Event Showcases Real Estate Community’s Long-Standing Support of Scouting;
Features Memorial Tribute to Don Koll

SANTA ANA, Calif. (May 28, 2013) – At this week’s 9th Investment Real Estate Luncheon, the Orange County Council, Boy Scouts of America (OCBSA) will honor James “Watty” Watson, CEO of CT Realty Investors, with the Good Scout Award for his contributions to the enhancement of the community and feature a memorial tribute to Don Koll for his legacy with the organization. The luncheon will be held on Thursday, May 30th, at the Irvine Marriott Hotel with a reception beginning at 11:15a.m.
“The luncheon celebrates the tremendous philanthropic contributions that our organization receives from the local real estate community, and Watty and Don are two exemplary examples of that support,” said Jeff Herrmann, president and Scout Executive for the OCBSA. “We are thrilled to honor their giving back to our local community at our event.”
John Hagestad, a past recipient of the Good Scout Award and managing director of the Sares?Regis Group, will emcee the event. Watty, who worked closely with Koll for many years, will receive the Good Scout Award primarily for his leadership role with the Good Scout Event, having served on and chaired the managing committee, and has contributed to Scouting and the local community for more than 10 years.
A Distinguished Eagle Scout Award recipient, Koll will be recognized posthumously for his invaluable contributions to Scouting through a video and formal dedication of Koll Mountain at the Irvine Ranch Outdoor Education Center (OEC), a property owned and operated by the OCBSA. His wife, Kathi Koll will speak at the event.
Nearly 400 leaders from the Orange County real estate community are expected to attend the luncheon. For further information on sponsorships and ticket reservations, contact Sally Lawrence by phone at 714.546.8558, extension 141, or by email at salawren@bsamail.org.
About the Orange County Council, Boy Scouts of America:

The Orange County Council is one of the largest youth-serving agencies in the county serving more than 30,000 youth with educational programs that instill values, develop social and leadership skills, and promotes physical fitness and environmental awareness. The mission of the Boy Scouts of America is to prepare young people to make ethical and moral choices over their lifetimes by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Scout Law.

 

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The BSA’s National Membership Policy

The BSA’s National Membership Policy

For 103 years, the Boy Scouts of America has been a part of the fabric of this nation, with a focus on working together to deliver the nation’s foremost youth program of character development and values-based leadership training.

Based on growing input from within the Scouting family, the BSA leadership chose to conduct an additional review of the organization’s long-standing membership policy and its impact on Scouting’s mission. This review created an outpouring of feedback from the Scouting family and the American public, from both those who agree with the current policy and those who support a change.

Following this review, the most comprehensive listening exercise in Scouting’s history, the voting members of the Boy Scouts of America’s National Council approved a resolution to remove the restriction denying membership to youth on the basis of sexual orientation alone. The resolution also reinforces that Scouting is a youth program, and any sexual conduct, whether heterosexual or homosexual, by youth of Scouting age is contrary to the virtues of Scouting. A change to the current membership policy for adult leaders was not under consideration; thus, the policy for adults remains in place. The BSA thanks all the national voting members who participated in this process and vote.

This policy change is effective Jan. 1, 2014, allowing the Boy Scouts of America the transition time needed to communicate and implement this policy to its approximately 116,000 Scouting units.

The Boy Scouts of America will not sacrifice its mission, or the youth served by the movement, by allowing the organization to be consumed by a single, divisive, and unresolved societal issue. As the National Executive Committee just completed a lengthy review process, there are no plans for further review on this matter.

While people have different opinions about this policy, we can all agree that kids are better off when they are in Scouting. Going forward, our Scouting family will continue to focus on reaching and serving youth in order to help them grow into good, strong citizens. America’s youth need Scouting, and by focusing on the goals that unite us, we can continue to accomplish incredible things for young people and the communities we serve.

For more information on the Boy Scouts of America’s membership standards, please visit www.bsamembershipstandards.org.

05/24/2013

ORANGE COUNTY’S MEN OF CHARACTIER RECOGNIZED BY ORANGE COUNTY COUNCIL, BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA

Eight Local Men Were Congratulated Last Week For Their Outstanding Service To The Community

IRVINE, Calif. (April 17, 2013) – The Orange County Council, Boy Scouts of America recognized eight Orange County men at the annual Men of Character dinner last Wednesday April 17 at the Hyatt Regency Irvine. They were acknowledged for great lifetime contributions to their community and the support of future men of character.

“Each honoree is a special individual. They have been selected because of their devotion to family, faith and community,” says Ralph Linzmeier, co-chairman of the Men of Character committee. “These men exemplify the traits of the Scout Law; trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean and reverent.”

Jeff Herrmann, Scout Executive and President of the Orange County Council, Boy Scouts of America, presided over the dinner. Co-chairman of the Men of Character committee Manny Montanez co-hosted the event with Linzmeier.

The Men of Character are selected after a lengthy process to ensure that every eligible man in Orange County is considered. The volunteer selection committee is composed of past honorees and Scouting volunteers. The eight men honored include business and philanthropic leaders across Orange County:

Rand Sperry, CEO of Sperry Equities, LLC and Sperry Commercial, INC, has over thirty-five years of experience in the commercial real estate industry in Southern California. A frequent motivational speaker at industry gatherings, Sperry is also a member of numerous civic and religious boards and committees in Orange County including: the Orange Catholic Foundation, Legatus of O.C. and First Friday Friars of Orange County.

Steve Samuelian is a founding partner of Haven Health Group and MiMo, a medical device company. He was also a founding partner of multiple healthcare companies and former president of multiple construction companies. Samuelian serves on several Boards and as the Chairman of The Perfect Moment Foundation, the Chairman of Care for Life, a non-profit organization that promotes self-reliance, health, education in Mozambique, Africa. He also serves on the board of directors for Rising Star Outreach that assists in eliminating the stigma of the Leprosy affected in India.

Dr. John Hovanesian is a board-certified ophthalmologist and specialist in refractive surgery, cataracts, cornea and external disease clinical assistant professor at the UCLA Jules Stein Eye Institute. An Eagle Scout, Hovanesian has spent many years volunteering for the Boy Scouts of America and has been recognized for his service. He has also made many trips overseas to third world countries to volunteer his time performing eye surgeries.

Dr. Harry L. White opened his private practice of orthodontics in Laguna Niguel, Calif. in 1977 after serving as Dental Officer for the U.S. Public Heath Service on the Chippewa Indian Reservation in Belcourt, North Dakota. One of the most prominent orthodontists in Orange County, White nearly lost his life in 2009 when he lost complete function of all vital organs. Referred to as “The Miracle Man,” he is healthy today coaching many different sports teams and inspiring young men and women to follow a positive path.

Dave Hanna is an entrepreneur with a heart for hospitality. In 2005 he established Hanna’s Restaurant and Bar in Rancho Santa Margarita, which serves as a platform for Hanna to give back to his neighbors, schools, business and charities. In 2009 Hanna founded Educate Rancho, a non-profit organization seeking to improve the quality of education in schools located in Rancho Santa Margarita by raising funds for program cuts. In addition, Hannah is a sponsor of the City of Hope, Mission Hospital and founded the Injured Marine Semper Fi Fund and America’s Fund to financially support critically ill members of the U.S Armed Forces.

Gary Crisp is the founder and president of C2, the largest privately owned reprographics, legal, color solutions and facilities management firm in Southern California. Crisp’s true passions are helping others. Recently he started “Real Guys,” a cause-related media property, anchored by a PBS network program, which focuses on helping inner city at-risk men. It explores the problems that plague many young men today with the hope of raising awareness and creating actionable education oriented programs at the grassroots level. Crisp is a member of numerous Orange County charities including Diocese of Orange, O.C. Foundation on Business and Ethics, Wounded Warriors and Human Options for Battered Women and Children.

Steve Greco is an ordained deacon in the Diocese of Orange and the Catholic Church. He is assigned to Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton parish in Irvine, Calif. He has been a health care executive for over 30 years and is currently the vice president of sales for Depomed, Inc. Greco has a great passion for life and serves on the Board of Birth Choice, as well as the Orange Coast Legatus and the Orange Diocese Deaconate Formation. Greco also gives talks and healing services throughout California in many parishes and for Catholic conferences and radio.

David Pyott joined Allergan in early 1998 as president and CEO. He has transformed the company from a small eye care business to a global specialty pharmaceutical and medical device company. In 2006, Pyott was bestowed with the honor of Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (CBE) by Her Majesty the Queen in acknowledgment of his contribution to British business excellence and management skills in the United States. He was recognized by Harvard Business Review as one of “The 100 Best CEOs in the World” in both 2009 (ranked #50) and 2013 (ranked #26). Pyott serves on the Board and as Chairman of the California Healthcare Institute, on the Board and on the Executive Committee of the Biotechnology Industry Organization, is Vice Chairman of the Board of Trustees of Chapman University, and on the Directors’ Board of The Paul Merage School of Business at the University of California Irvine.

MOC all eight honorees

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From left to right: Rand Sperry, Steve Samuelian, Dr. John Hovanesian, Dr. Harry L. White, Dave Hanna, Gary Crisp, Steve Greco and David Pyott

About The Boy Scouts of America
The Boy Scouts of America provides the nation’s foremost youth program of character development and values-based leadership training, which helps young people be “Prepared. For Life™.” The Scouting organization is composed of 2.7 million youth members between the ages of 7 and 21 and more than a million volunteers in nearly 300 local councils throughout the United States and its territories. For more information on the Boy Scouts of America, please visit www.scouting.org.

SANTA ANA EAGLE SCOUT DELIVERS ANNUAL REPORT TO THE NATION TO TOP U.S. OFFICIAL

Local Eagle Scout Is One of Eight Selected to Share 2012 Scouting Achievements with Congress

SANTA ANA, CA (Feb. 15, 2013)—A delegation of eight young people from across the country— including Ben Sanchez of the Orange County Council Boy Scouts of America —will represent the Boy Scouts of America® in Washington, D.C., Feb. 23–28, to present the organization’s annual Report to the Nation to top U.S. officials. The report is designated in the BSA’s congressional charter and will highlight the organization’s achievements in 2012.

“This is an incredible achievement and we are proud to have Ben share our progress with the nation’s leaders,” said Jeff Herrmann, president and scout executive for the Orange County Council, Boy Scouts of America (OCBSA). “Ben exemplifies a committed, ambitious and dedicated leader who represents the Boy Scouts of America constituency.”

Being selected to the Report to the Nation delegation is a tremendous honor for Ben Sanchez and the Santa Ana community that he represents. Each Scout represents the more than 100 million Boy Scouts who have come before them and the millions who will follow. Sanchez, a 16-year-old Eagle Scout, was selected as a delegate for his extraordinary work on his Eagle Scout Leadership Project. His project involved gathering a team of scout and non-scout volunteers to help create a website for the Confirmation Preparation program at his parish. The project was sponsored by the Knights of Columbus, Council 9210 from Our Lady of the Pillar parish located in Santa Ana, Calif.

Sanchez’ goal in creation of the website was to provide educational resources and materials for confirmation candidates, allowing users to ultimately learn, better understand and grow in their Catholic faith online. The website includes Bible passages, texts from the Catechism of the Catholic Church, links to the Vatican website, 360 degree panoramas of St. Peter’s Basilica, the Sistine Chapel, local churches and videos of the sacraments. Sanchez’ team of youth volunteers and adults worked on the project for more than a year. The website, which has received 9,570 visitors to date, can be viewed here: http://kofc9210.org/Confirmation.php.

Arriving in the nation’s capital on Saturday, Feb. 23, Ben Sanchez and the other Boy Scouts of America delegates are scheduled for visits throughout the week with U.S. Cabinet, House, and Senate leadership, as well as the White House, CIA, Pentagon, and Supreme Court.

Locally, the Orange County Council has contributed to the national report that will be shared through the delivery of a quality Scouting experience in Orange County, serving more than 30,000 local youth members in 2012. Specifically, the Orange County Council Boy Scouts of America has awarded 738 Eagle Scout badges to Orange County youth in 2012. More than 650 Eagle Scout awards are earned on an annual basis in Orange County, marking an 11% increase from 2011 (697 Eagle Scout awards earned) and 6% increase from 2010 (663 Eagle Scout awards earned).

Collectively, in 2012, 57,976 young Scouts across America earned the Eagle Scout Award through the completion of 21 life skills merit badges and an extensive self-directed service project. The average number of hours spent on an Eagle Scout project is 130, which means that in 2012, Eagle Scout service projects alone represented more than 7.5 million hours of community service.
To keep track of the Report to the Nation delegates as they embark on this once-in-a-lifetime experience in Washington, D.C., follow @boyscouts on Twitter or Boy Scouts of America on Facebook.

About The Orange County Council, Boy Scouts of America:
The Orange County Council is one of the largest youth-serving agencies in the county serving more than 30,000 youth with educational programs that instill values, develop social and leadership skills, and promotes physical fitness and environmental awareness. The mission of the Boy Scouts of America is to prepare young people to make ethical and moral choices over their lifetimes by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Scout Law.

About the Boy Scouts of America
The Boy Scouts of America prepares young people for life by providing the nation’s foremost youth program of character development and values-based leadership training. The Scouting organization is composed of 2.7 million youth members from ages 6 through 20 and more than a million volunteers in local councils throughout the United States and its territories. For more information on the Boy Scouts of America, please visit www.scouting.org.